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thought provoking book

I’ve known about the California Fibershed movement for quite some time. I long to have a movement like that here in the Mid Atlantic. Have you heard of it before? It started as a local indigo project and grew to a movement to source one’s clothes responsibly and preferably with 100 miles of your home. This can be really hard to do.

The first part of this book details how Fibershed got started and also the really alarming cost of our clothes to our health and the health of the environment. The fashion industry has brought us fast fashion. Clothes that are popular right now for a very short period of time. The 2 biggest manufacturers of fast fashion produce one billion items per year. Most of which are worn a few times and thrown away. Most of these clothes end up in our landfills, becoming more than 5% of all of the municipal waste each year. Over 80 billion garments were sold in 2017 which equals a $1.3 trillion industry employing 300 million people from nearly every country. The majority of those jobs pay a very low wage.

I didn’t realize just how damaging washing your clothes could be. Of course the detergents an be unhealthy for many people. And these synthetic clothes shed microfibers in each and every washing. These microfibers make their way into our water, where up to 40% end up in rivers, lakes and oceans. We know what these plastics are doing in our environment.

5 mini skein gradient

What can you do? Well, you buy clothes that will last for a long time, those made from natural fibers and not made from petroleum by-products. You can recycle your clothes by mending them or repurposing them into quilts or other textile items in your home. You can wash your clothes when they are soiled but probably not every time your wear them. And as knitters, crocheters, sewers and makers, you can be part of the fibershed movement. Consider making a wardrobe for yourself or others. Of course wool, alpaca, mohair and cashmere grown locally is sustainable and renewable. We fiber farmers are happy to help you build a wonderful, colorful wardrobe.

knitting in the wild

I encourage you to read this book and consider the impact of choices we all make in clothing ourselves and our families.

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curated shawl trios for your new shawl

So many people feel overwhelmed when trying to make color choices for the next new shawl or sweater. Helping shoppers pick out colors is one of my favorite things, so I thought I would put together skeins that will make your next new thing.

All of these threesomes are fingering weight, but some are Corrie Sock, some are Really Fine and some are Sparkly.

I searched Ravelry’s patterns and there are more than 4300 choices of shawls that use 1200 yards of yarn. The choices are immense. Lots of A-list designers have shawls that use this kind of yarn in this amount: Stephen West, Melanie Berg, Casapinka and Andrea Mowry just to name a few.

Which will you choose for your next project? Click here to find the triad that knocks your socks off.

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last minute gifts

Are you feeling the holiday crunch? Or are you trying not to think about it? Well knitting up a quick hat or mitts could be done in the couple of weeks that is left until the holiday week. We have kits for fingerless mitts made with our own 2ply mohair yarn. Click here to see the choices.

Do you sometimes have to point your loved ones in the right direction to what you really, really want? We are offering gift cards for the first time this year. Click here to go to our secure gift card provider, Squareup. Your family and friends can pick any denomination. And you can use it in the next year for all kinds of beautiful skeins or even a class or two!

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when yarn and pattern come together

A couple of years ago, a knitter came into our festival booth with a gorgeous scarf that was full of flame shapes. Of course I asked about it and came to find out that the yarn needs to be specially dyed for it. I put the scarf into my Ravelry queue. It is called Optical Delusion: Conflagration. See it here.

Then I forgot about it, as one does, right? So I finally tackled dyeing up some Sparkly yarn to make the scarf. Here is an in process photo, because I have yet to finish it. This pattern is full of short rows and I must count every row, so it’s only something I can work on when I’m alone and totally alert.

So I’ve dyed up 2 colorways for this project for you. You can buy a kit that includes a skein of yarn and the pattern here. Your order will be individually hand dyed once you order.

If you want to see it in person, come out to the Holiday Fiber Art Studio Tour this coming weekend.

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Thankful

What am I thankful for?

Love seeing my yarn in the wild.

Kira’s wonderful new shawl made with Alto yarn

Meeting new people at trunk shows and fiber festivals.

Wonderful shawl made with Zephyrette and Chinook yarns Rhinebeck festival

students in all our classes

Gnomes made at our class taught by Dawn Viands

unconditional love of dogs, cats, sheep and goats

Panchia on duty

wonderful food grown right here

squishy yarns made with love from the sheep, goats, mills and me

wool marled yarn
Synergy yarn

creativity all around me

Indigo dyeing of napkins and kitchen towels

friends and family, visits with those I love.

Friends and family awaiting our escape room adventure!

and you dear readers! I’m so grateful!